A Wise Exchange

Jim Elliot Journal

On Fridays, I am posting quotes from some of my favorite authors as a way to review golden nuggets of truth and keep them in the forefront of my own heart and mind throughout the year.

I also hope it serves you, as a reader of RevivingTheSoul, in offering comfort, encouragement, and strength for your own journey in the ups and downs of life on this side of heaven.

This quote is from Jim Elliot, one of my heroes. He was one of five missionaries killed while attempting to preach the gospel to the Auca Indians in Ecuador in 1956. This is something Jim had written in his journal:

“He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose.”

Jim Elliot

No Bounds for Spiritual and Gracious Appetites

Jonathan_Edwards

On Fridays, I am posting quotes from some of my favorite authors as a way to review golden nuggets of truth and keep them in the forefront of my own heart and mind throughout the year.

I also hope it serves you, as a reader of RevivingTheSoul, in offering comfort, encouragement, and strength for your own journey in the ups and downs of life on this side of heaven.

Today’s quote comes from the sermons and discourses of Jonathan Edwards in “The Spiritual Blessings of the Gospel Represented by a Feast” (The Works of Jonathan Edwards, vol. 17, Sermons and Discourses, 1729) and “Sacrament Sermon on Canticles 5:1” as quoted by John Piper in his excellent book When I Don’t Desire God.

Edwards writes,

“Persons need not and ought not to set any bounds to their spiritual and gracious appetites, {instead they ought] to be endeavoring by all possible ways to inflame their desires and to obtain more spiritual pleasures… Our hungerings and thirstings after God and Jesus Christ and after holiness can’t be too great for the value of these things, for they are things of infinite value…[Therefore] endeavor to promote spiritual appetites by laying yourself in the way of allurement… There is no such thing as excess in our taking of this spiritual food. There is no such virtue as temperance in spiritual feasting.”

Beams of Majesty and a Heart of Mercy

the bruised reed

On Fridays, I’ve decided to post quotes from some of my favorite authors as a way for me to review golden nuggets of truth and keep them in the forefront of my own heart and mind throughout the year.

I also hope it serves you, as a reader of RevivingTheSoul in offering comfort, encouragement, and strength for your own journey in the ups and downs of life on this side of heaven.

This Friday’s quote comes from the Puritan, Richard Sibbes, from one of the books that has impacted me the most, The Bruised Reed, which I read in the midst of one of the most difficult seasons of my life and God used it to greatly comfort me. There is healing in these words from “The Heavenly Doctor Sibbes”:

“(Christ) is a meek king; he will admit mourners into his presence, a king of poor and afflicted persons. As he has beams of majesty, so he has a heart of mercy and compassion. He is the prince of peace (Isa. 9:6). Why was he tempted, but that he might ‘succour them that are tempted’ (Heb. 2:18)? What mercy may we not expect from so gracious a Mediator (1 Tim. 2:5) who took our nature upon him that he might be gracious?…

What should we learn from this, but to ‘come boldly to the throne of grace’ (Heb. 4:16) in all our grievances? Shall our sins discourage us, when he appears there only for sinners? Are you bruised? Be of good comfort, he calls you. Conceal not your wounds, open all before him and take not Satan’s counsel. Go to Christ, although trembling, as the poor woman who said, ‘If I may but touch his garment’ (Matt. 9:21). We shall be healed and have a gracious answer… Peace and joy are two main fruits of Christ’s kingdom. Let the world be as it will, if we cannot rejoice in the world, yet we may rejoice in the Lord. His presence makes any condition comfortable.” The Bruised Reed, p. 8-9